Operation Recovery

The Fort Hood Testimony Report


Among other topics, the service-members and veterans on this page testified to Army mismanagement and mishandling of their health conditions while navigating the Medical Evaluation Board (MEB) process.

“If they feel that they need you out, they’re gonna kick you out. If they feel they can get a little bit more work into you, it doesn’t matter what your case may be, it doesn’t matter how injured you may be, they’re going to work you until you’re fully broken.”

Read the full testimony of Cody DeSousa *, active duty US Army, Systems Specialist


“Prior to going, our unit was so low in numbers that we actually took soldiers into Afghanistan who were on crutches. We’re walking fifteen, twenty cliffs a day at 10,000 feet elevation through the mountains. The guy just got off crutches and you expect him to be able to do that?”

Read the full testimony of Chas Jacquier, US Army veteran, Military Police, NCO

“My care began when I was in Iraq, after an incident where I pointed a weapon at somebody, and I had to go see a shrink. They had my weapon back in my hands within three days.”

Read the full testimony of Malachi Muncy, Army National Guard veteran, truck driver


“I just decided to pay out of my own pocket to see a neurologist at Central Texas Neurology. I explained to him my situation—that there wasn’t much being done to help me or to evaluate me. The Army can say that they tried to help me by putting me through physical therapy, but they didn’t help me. You can’t put somebody through physical therapy without identifying the problem.”

Read the full testimony of Mitchell Tate *, active duty US Army, Infantry


“Last week I got my rating from the VA finally, after two and a half years of being out of the military. They’re gonna finally rate me at 100%. I’ve been unemployed the entire time, just because of the disabilities I received in deployment.”

Read the full testimony of Devon Sawyer *, US Army veteran, Tanker


“I have run across numerous forums and other soldier chat-rooms, where I’ve talked to soldiers at other posts that are going through the exact same stuff that I am. That helps a little bit, it makes me feel better knowing I’m not the only one. But it doesn’t change the fact that this is a severe problem, which needs to be addressed and fixed.”

Read the full testimony of Cory Williams *, active duty US Army, Infantry


“My husband talked to everybody that was important. He knew that would help us. We had to extend my leave after my brain surgery. My company only approved 90 days for me, while my doctor had said I needed 120 days to recover, if not more. They were trying to get me back to work, but I couldn’t even walk. I still can’t walk now, barely.”

Read the full testimony of Eve Morgan *, active duty US Army, Special Operations Team


“I just kind of snapped. And that’s when the red flags went up. It took something like that for people to realize that I was legitimately having issues. When before whenever I’d say, ‘Hey, I think I need to go talk to somebody,’ they’d be like, ‘Oh, don’t be stupid. It’ll ruin your career.'”

Read the full testimony of Ian Augusto *, active duty US Army, Tanker


“The Army is already saying they can’t help me. It’s kind of weird, because how in the hell are you going to say to me that you can’t help me, when I gave you all of my fricking youth?”

Read the full testimony of Josue Gomez *, active duty US Army, Infantry


“Whenever I used to have to go to sick call, I’d get that scornful look from NCOs. And the stigma never really stops. They would say, ‘Oh, he’s weak. Screw him, he’s weak. He’s trying to find an excuse, he’s trying to malinger.’ It didn’t stop me from getting help though, because at the end of the day, it’s my health.”

Read the full testimony of Jesse Bowe *, US Army veteran, seven years