Operation Recovery

The Fort Hood Testimony Report


Among other topics, the service-members and veterans on this page discussed traumatic brain injuries, and the Army’s process for evaluating and treating them.

“(My Commander) said, in front of my counselor, with me in the room, ‘If you had not been drinking that night, you would never have been raped. It is your fault, because you were drinking.’…Nothing was done according to regulation..Honestly, it makes me realize why so many victims do not report.”

Read the full testimony of Rebekah Lampman, US Army veteran, Broadcast Journalist


“Prior to going, our unit was so low in numbers that we actually took soldiers into Afghanistan who were on crutches. We’re walking fifteen, twenty cliffs a day at 10,000 feet elevation through the mountains. The guy just got off crutches and you expect him to be able to do that?”

Read the full testimony of Chas Jacquier, US Army veteran, Military Police, NCO

“I wanted to tell my doctor, ‘These drugs don’t feel good. I don’t want to take these any more, but I don’t know if I can just stop. Or is this a normal feeling? Are the first few days always kind of crazy?’ And I can’t get ahold of him. I don’t have his number. I had to make an appointment for another month out.”

Read the full testimony of Ryan Holleran, US Army veteran, Infantry


“I was more or less told, especially when it came to smoking soldiers, and writing them up, to do everything I could to fuck them up without breaking their profile. Like, some people’s profiles say, ‘Run at own pace and distance.’ The Army takes that as, ‘You run until you fucking die.'”

Read the full testimony of Jim Frank*, US Army veteran, NCO


“The drinking made it worse, and worse. And then, it got so bad that I really couldn’t even do anything but sit there. Some nights I would just cry all night. It was horrible.”

Read the full testimony of Jake Leighton *, active duty US Army, Infantry


“I thought, ‘Oh my God, something is not right.’ He sounded like a whole different person. My friend was there, and I sort of dropped the phone to her and said, ‘Hold on, I need to get some fresh air.’ It was that drastic of a difference.”

Read the full testimony of Nora Leighton *, Spouse of an active duty service-member


“My care began when I was in Iraq, after an incident where I pointed a weapon at somebody, and I had to go see a shrink. They had my weapon back in my hands within three days.”

Read the full testimony of Malachi Muncy, Army National Guard veteran, truck driver


“From the time I said, ‘I want to get out,’ until the time I got home to the VA, I didn’t get any treatment. Alls I got was drugs.”

Read the full testimony of Curtis Sirmans, US Army veteran, Cavalry Scout


“I get punished all the time, for fighting uphill battles to try and take care of them. So much that I don’t want to be in the Army anymore. I’m just fed up with it. And then all these other soldiers now are stuck with the NCOs who don’t care. They’re here for a paycheck.

…There’s no reward for taking care of soldiers.”

Read the full testimony of Paul Avett *, active duty US Army, NCO, Mechanic


“We do have one soldier that was handed to me, who actually went to seek help, and he got the help that he was needing. But now they’re looking at trying to chapter him out because of the help that he had to get, and the things that happened to make him finally turn around and say, ‘Hey, I need help.’.’”

Read the full testimony of Reese Stewart *, active duty US Army, NCO


“I had another doctor who just sat in on the weekends and he looked like he was high as a kite, and he looked at me flat-faced when I told him my story, and he said, ‘Well, honestly, I don’t think that the best psychologist would be able to help you. You’re essentially a hopeless case.'”

Read the full testimony of James Cleary *, active duty US Army, Chaplain’s assistant


“Seeing a psychiatrist? That was reasonably easy. You might have had to be on a waiting list, it might take a few weeks unless you were suicidal or homicidal at that moment. But, once you saw the psychiatrist, they gave you the whole cabinet full of pills and they sent you on your way, pretty much.”

Read the full testimony of Mark Simons *, Conscientious Objector


“You do take the survey, you do sit down with what they say is a physician. But you sit in a little cubby and they ask you “Are you depressed? Have you hit your head? Have you done this?” And that’s it.”

Read the full testimony of Anja Perry, active duty US Army, Cargo


“Last week I got my rating from the VA finally, after two and a half years of being out of the military. They’re gonna finally rate me at 100%. I’ve been unemployed the entire time, just because of the disabilities I received in deployment.”

Read the full testimony of Devon Sawyer *, US Army veteran, Tanker


“We have to abandon this idea of machismo and become a more intelligent and capable military. Too many biases of individuals have spread throughout the ranks and affected many soldiers who need help.”

Read the full testimony of Max Diaz *, US Army veteran, Cavalry


“My husband talked to everybody that was important. He knew that would help us. We had to extend my leave after my brain surgery. My company only approved 90 days for me, while my doctor had said I needed 120 days to recover, if not more. They were trying to get me back to work, but I couldn’t even walk. I still can’t walk now, barely.”

Read the full testimony of Eve Morgan *, active duty US Army, Special Operations Team


“I just kind of snapped. And that’s when the red flags went up. It took something like that for people to realize that I was legitimately having issues. When before whenever I’d say, ‘Hey, I think I need to go talk to somebody,’ they’d be like, ‘Oh, don’t be stupid. It’ll ruin your career.'”

Read the full testimony of Ian Augusto *, active duty US Army, Tanker


“I think that war affects the soldier very much, I have no doubt about that. But I think it equally affects the family. Equally, because I could not even describe to you the pain in the wife’s point of view or the child’s point of view, when the soldier acts out.”

Read the full testimony of Shauna Dione *, spouse of an active duty service member


“I tore my back muscles the first day of Basic Training, and they still haven’t healed right. That was 1998. Their whole gearing was return to duty. If they can’t prove something is actually wrong, they won’t send you to a specialist to find out, they’ll just send you back to duty. They give me some Motrin, tell me to have a nice day.”

Read the full testimony of Allen Dunajs * US Army veteran, Infantry, and his wife Clarissa *